PANORAMIC AND 360 DEGREE PHOTOGRAPHY

Panoramic photography is a technique (sometimes known as wide format photography) that captures images with horizontally elongated fields of view with specialized equipment or software. This generally means it has an aspect ratio of 2:1 or larger, the image being at least twice as wide as it is high. The resulting images take the form of a wide strip. Some panoramic images have aspect ratios of 4:1 and sometimes 10:1, covering fields of view of up to 360 degrees. The device of the panorama existed in painting as early as 20 A.D. Early examples
were discovered in the ruins of Pompeii. Shortly after the invention of photography in 1839, the desire to show overviews of cities and landscapes prompted photographers to create panoramas by placing two or more daguerreotype plates (type of photographic process) side-by-side.

The development of digital technology means that you can take your own panoramic photos using wide-lens digital cameras or even your own smartphone using a downloadable app, such as Cardboard Camera. You can use Google Cardboard to view the results for an immersive experience.

panoramic

The development of digital technology means that you can take your own panoramic photos using wide-lens digital cameras or even your own smartphone using a downloadable app, such as Cardboard Camera. You can use Google Cardboard to view the results for an immersive experience.

 

 

3D OBJECT SCANNING

3D (three-dimensional) scanning is an imaging technique that collects distance point measurements from a real-world object with the use of a 3D scanner and translates them into a virtual 3D object.

3D scanners are used for creating life-like images and animation in movies and video games. Other uses of 3D scanning include reverse engineering, prototyping, architectural and industrial modelling, medical imaging and medical device modelling. 3D printers can use data from 3D scans to create physical objects.

3dscanner

One of the popular ways of 3D scanning is using a Microsoft Kinect™ sensor and free software such as 3D Scan or ReconstructMe. By moving the sensor around an object (e.g. a historic artefact) or turning it around in front of it (e.g. using a turntable or swivel chair) you can create a virtual 3D model. Same applies to people – you can scan your friend or take a 3D selfie!

 

HISTORYLENS APP

HistoryLens, developed by Linknode (TrueViewVisuals), is an app using GPS which brings historical content to life with 3D visualisations, augmented reality and map-free navigation for engagement of heritage site visitors. HistoryLens allows visitors to easily explore an area, helping them to discover local heritage landmarks using interactive maps or intuitive augmented reality navigation. Augmented reality is a fun and new way to explore a locality – seeing what is nearby and where to go next without needing a map or knowing how to read one.

POP-UP EXHIBITION

A pop-up exhibition is a temporary event, less formal than a gallery or museum but more formal than private showing of work and ideas. The concept began in 2007 in New York City where space for exhibiting work (artistic or other) is very limited. Such event forms a great opportunity to engage with people and organisations who might be interested in or benefit from your work.

SOCIAL MEDIA AND ONLINE CONVERSATIONS

Social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram have become extremely popular methods of communication and engagement in the early 21st century. They can be used to promote your local heritage and the area. Well written and illustrated posts will make the online audience pay attention and raise their interest. The users of your social media channels will then likely want to take part in discussion with you and others about the meaning of heritage and its use.

PLANNING
(working with planners, community councils and the public)

Scotland’s planning system puts a strong emphasis on involving people and communities to have their say on what a place looks like. Planning decides where
development should happen, where it should not happen, and how it affects and fits into its surroundings. When thinking of ways of engaging with heritage, placemaking and using it for everyone’s benefit, you can approach planning professionals and community councils (a public representative body interested in improving the community). Co-operating with them will help you create an inclusive action plan and let you learn more about the planning system.